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Reptiles and Amphibians

Ontario is a vast province, rich in biodiversity. Yet every year, more plants and animals are added to Ontario’s list of species at risk, which now numbers more than 200.

Ontario Nature is actively involved in research, public education and policy work on their behalf.

Northern ring-necked snake © Joe Crowley


Please Read: Big Changes to the Ontario Reptile and Amphibian Atlas

The Atlas is transitioning into a new era, with Ontario Nature wrapping-up the data collection phase of this project as of December 1, 2019. Now that our app and online form have gone offline, we encourage you to continue submitting any future observations through the ‘Herps of Ontario’ project on iNaturalist or directly to the Natural Heritage Information Centre for species at risk. To learn more about the transition, read our blog.


Turtles | Snakes | Lizard | Salamanders | Frogs and Toads

Click on the picture or name to view a photo, range map and description of each species found in Ontario. Learn about non-native reptiles and amphibians in Ontario.

Turtles

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Blanding’s Turtle
(Emydoidea blandingii)

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Eastern Box Turtle
(Terrapene carolina)

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Eastern Musk Turtle
(Sternotherus odoratus)

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Midland Painted Turtle
(Chrysemys picta marginata)

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Northern Map Turtle
(Graptemys geographica)

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Snapping Turtle
(Chelydra serpentina)

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Spiny Softshell
(Apalone spinifera)

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Spotted Turtle
(Clemmys guttata)

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Western Painted Turtle
(Chrysemys picta bellii)

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Wood Turtle
(Glyptemys insculpta)

Snakes

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Blue Racer
(Coluber constrictor foxii)

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Butler’s Gartersnake
(Thamnophis butleri)

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Eastern Foxsnake
(Pantherophis vulpinus)

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Eastern Gartersnake
(Thamnophis sirtalis sirtalis)

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Eastern Hog-nosed Snake
(Heterodon platirhinos)

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Eastern Ribbonsnake
(Thamnophis sauritus)

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Gray Ratsnake
(Pantherophis spiloides)

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Lake Erie Watersnake
(Nerodia sipedon insularum)

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Massasauga
(Sistrurus catenatus)

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Milksnake
(Lampropeltis triangulum)

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Northern Watersnake
(Nerodia sipedon sipedon)

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Queensnake
(Regina septemvittata)

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Red-bellied Snake
(Storeria occipitomaculata)

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Red-sided Gartersnake
(Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis)

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Smooth Greensnake
(Opheodrys vernalis)

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Timber Rattlesnake
(Crotalus horridus)

Lizard

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Five-lined Skink 
(Plestiodon fasciatus)

Salamanders

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Blue-spotted Salamander
(Ambystoma laterale)

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Central Newt
(Notophthalmus viridescens louisianensis)

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Eastern Tiger Salamander 
(Ambystoma tigrinum
)

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Four-toed Salamander
(Hemidactylium scutatum)

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Jefferson Salamander
(Ambystoma jeffersonianum)

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Mudpuppy
(Necturus maculosus)

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Northern Dusky Salamander
(Desmognathus fuscus)

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Red-spotted Newt 
(Notophthalmus viridescens viridescens)

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Spotted Salamander
(Ambystoma maculatum)

Frogs and Toads

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American Bullfrog
(Lithobates catesbeianus)

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American Toad
(Anaxyrus americanus)

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Boreal Chorus Frog
(Pseudacris maculata)

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Fowler’s Toad
(Anaxyrus fowleri)

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Gray Treefrog
(Hyla versicolor)

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Green Frog
(Lithobates clamitans)

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Mink Frog
(Lithobates septentrionalis)

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Northern Leopard Frog
(Lithobates pipiens)

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Pickerel Frog
(Lithobates palustris)

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Spring Peeper
(Pseudacris crucifer)

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Western Chorus Frog
(Pseudacris triseriata)

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Wood Frog
(Lithobates sylvaticus)

View a map of the known ranges of all reptile and amphibian species in Ontario.

Learn about non-native reptiles and amphibians in Ontario.

* Last updated March 2022

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