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Wallwork Nature Reserve

Ontario Nature’s most northern nature reserve is part of the Jocko Bay Provincially Significant Wetland.

Black-throated green warbler © Tim Lenz CC BY 2.0

About

Ontario Nature’s most northern nature reserve is part of the Jocko Bay Provincially Significant Wetland.

The entire property was logged before the Sault Field Naturalists (now the Sault Naturalists’ Club of Ontario and Michigan) purchased the property in 1968, but good stands of cedar have grown back on the property’s western section and its natural restoration process continues since becoming protected.

Showy lady's-slipper orchid, Wallwork Nature Reserve

Plants and Animals

A number of northern orchid species can be found on the property, including dragon’s mouth, heartleaf twayblade and green adder’s-mouth. Rattlesnake plantain can be found on the drier ground of the wooded knoll.

Typical northern bird species, such as black-throated green warbler, can be seen on the reserve. Small mammals include beavers, muskrats and mink – all of which are abundant.

Harris's checkerspot, Wallwork Nature Reserve © Mark Olivier

Visiting

Ontario Nature’s most northern nature reserve is part of the Jocko Bay Provincially Significant Wetland.

The 41-hectare (100-acre) property, located on St. Joseph Island southeast of Sault Ste. Marie, consists mostly of cedar swamp and marsh. Swamp thickets of alder and dogwood, a treed knoll, an abandoned field and a treed fen are also found on the reserve.

We do not charge a fee for entrance and there are no operating hours on any of our nature reserves. Properties are monitored by volunteer stewards. We rely on visitors to be safe, minimize their impact on nature and be respectful of others. For more information about visiting the reserves, please read our Permitted Activities Policy.

We welcome donations to support this nature reserve and our system of 26 nature reserves.

Gladys Wallwork at head of line © Valerie Walker

Directions

It is best to contact the Sault Naturalists’ Club of Ontario and Michigan before heading to the reserve as the property is not marked and there are no formal trails. The property is not easily accessible. In spring, it is virtually underwater and throughout the year the old logging roads that are used as trails are soggy at best.

Monarch female © Mark Olivier